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Interview with Christian Eilers

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Christian Eilers is a twenty-something who started the Dauntless Jaunter Travel Site three years ago; originally, it was a travel blog simply for him to document his travels, but since then it has evolved into more of an all-encompassing travel site, with destination guides, reviews, news, and educational material.

 

CAE Profile Pic

 

1. Honestly, do you find it hard to stay fit when traveling? If so, what is the biggest challenge for you?

 

It depends on where I go; for instance, if I travel to the Caribbean, the warm air and proximity to green-colored sea seem to invigorate me and give me energy, so I want to hike all day outside and see the sites. When I go to Warsaw in February, when it is -30 C, I want to take a taxi just to cross the street. That’s a challenge enough, I’d say, since the cold makes me not want to be so active, but then it is compounded when the foods I crave when it is cold are heavier, fattier foods.

 

2. What do you think about vegetarian/vegan/raw food diets? Do you follow any of them?

 

I have many friends that do, but I need some kind of meat/fish almost daily 🙂

 

3. What sports do you practice on the road?

 

Hmm.. not so many sports of the organized variety. Like I mentioned before, I get my exercise from walking until my shoes have holes in them.

 

4. Do you think mental or spiritual side is also important when staying fit? Is meditation close to you?

 

I’m not such a spiritual person, and I wish I could meditate, but your mental state is definitely most important when staying fit, especially when abroad. When you are in a foreign city, you might tend to justify letting go of your diet or exercise regime. “I’m on vacation,” you may say, “I’ll work out and go back to my diet when I get home.” This is dangerous thinking, because we all know how hard it is to get back into the daily life routine once the trip is over.

 

5. Your top 3 tips for other travelers to stay fit when traveling?

 

1. Use everything at your disposal; use your imagination to locate a pull-up bar on a tree limb or curling a gallon of milk at the supermarket for a few sets.

2. Be overly conscious of what you eat while abroad; not only are you probably going to relax your normal diet rules, but you also may not be sure of the ingredients and how heavy they are on your body.

3. Sleep well. It’s often not associated with fitness, but good sleep sets the pace for the following day. You may already start off at a disadvantage if you are experiencing jet lag. A good night’s sleep allows you to feel more energy the next day, helping you to stay active; metabolism is also not affected when you get your normal sleep, therefore helping to burn all those extra calories you might consume while on your trip.

 

 

Interview with Colin Wright

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Colin Wright is an author, entrepreneur, and full-time traveler who moves to a new country every four months based on the votes of his readers. He blogs at Exile Lifestyle and tweets a lot.

 

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1. Honestly, do you find it hard to stay fit when traveling? If so, what is the biggest challenge for you?

Some times more than others. Kolkata was tricky, because the food is cheap and delicious and there isn’t a great public infrastructure for working out (jogging isn’t really a thing there, and the sidewalks wouldn’t support it even if it was). On the other hand, many places I go make it pretty easy — there are healthy options available, and it’s not too much trouble to work out in the morning, and maybe a little during the day away from home.
The biggest challenge tends to be in places that are very polluted, because then I don’t feel like working out — it’s as if the air itself is trying to keep me from breathing correctly, and my nostrils are lined with soot when I come home at the end of the day. The way around this is just to establish a habit in the morning that’s easy enough to follow through with, even if you don’t feel like it, and to adjust according to your surroundings (no jumping jacks if you’re on the second floor of a flimsy building, so maybe do more crunches, instead).

2. What do you think about vegetarian/vegan/raw food diets? Do you follow any of them?

I think they’re all really nice ideas, and I take part in them from time to time, when possible.
I don’t find them terribly practical every place I go, however, and it’s my policy to eat as healthy as I can 90% of the time, which then allows me to do whatever I like the other 10%. If I was going to do one of those full-time, I would apply the same rule, giving me some wiggle-room, so that I don’t accidentally offend a host or miss out on something important about a culture I’m visiting.

3. What sports do you practice on the road?

None regularly, but I played intercollegiate Ultimate Frisbee in college, and I’ve been known to do the same when I spot a pickup game while on the road.

4. Do you think mental or spiritual side is also important when staying fit? Is meditation close to you?

I’m not a spiritual person, but I do take 20 minutes a day to sit quietly and do absolutely nothing. This ‘meditation’ allows me to untangle my thoughts and refocus on what’s important. A lot of deep-diving can be accomplished in a short period of time, so long as you allow yourself to do it regularly, and get accustomed to letting go in that way, if only for a short period of time.

5. Your top 3 tips for other travelers to stay fit when traveling?

1. Come up with a routine that works for you (don’t try and force yourself to copy someone else if it doesn’t work for your body or your schedule).
2. Make passive exercise a part of your routine (take the stairs when you have the option, do some jumping jacks or pushups every half-hour when sitting at your computer, etc).
3. Don’t eat horribly and expect exercise to cover for you. Combine a decent diet with some regular, light exercise, and you’d be surprised how effective (and painless, and flexible) it can be.

Interview with Jeremy Albelda

Jeremy Albelda
I am starting a new series of interviews with travelers, travel bloggers and just anyone who has some tips on how to stay fit when traveling. The first one is with Jeremy.
Jeremy Albelda is the creator of The World or Bust.com, a travel blog about his frequent travels around the world. He holds a BS Ed. in Exercise Physiology from the University of Miami and is also a certified personal trainer.
Jeremy Albelda

1. Honestly, do you find it hard to stay fit when traveling? If so, what is the biggest challenge for you?

 

I don’t find it too hard to stay fit while traveling because I make it a goal to get in really good shape before going away on a long adventure so I can just focus on maintenance, which is much easier. Now a days, gyms are pretty ubiquitous and chances are you’ll find one with minimal searching. I try and go at least once or twice a week and just do full body workouts.

2. What do you think about vegetarian/vegan/raw food diets? Do you follow any of them?

 

I’m not personally a vegetarian, but I have friends who are travel bloggers as well and while it might be a bit harder to find quality vegetarian restaurants, it’s doable.

3. What sports do you practice on the road?

 

My favorite sports to do while traveling are mountain biking and surfing.

4. Do you think mental or spiritual side is also important when staying fit? Is meditation close to you?

 

I’m an atheist and not spiritual either, but knowing yourself, how to calm yourself down, etc. is important for not only mental health but also physical. Stress releases cortisol, a hormone that is not good to have in your body all the time.

5. Your top 3 tips for other travelers to stay fit when traveling?

 

1. Walk. Not only will you see more of a place you’re visiting, but you’ll burn way more calories and save yourself money on transportation.
2. Don’t drink in excess. Drinking too much will quickly make you gain weight and also make you lethargic and more prone to eat crappy food.
3. Stay Hydrated. Flying a lot or spending time in air conditioned buses and trains will suck the water out of you and not only make you more tired, but will depress your immune system as well.